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News & For Sale “3D printing a firearm” by Amanda

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Devi 6 years ago on 06/10/13
Equipped: Lawn Gnome named "Pablo"
This was something I was arguing with the boyfriend last night. He insists that 3d printing a gun just isn't worth it and it wouldn't work very well. Even if it were printed with metal it probably couldn't stand up to actual use because of the heat created by firing the bullet would likely destroy it. It would probably be more efficient to use a C&C machine to carve a gun out of steel or even make molds of the parts like John mentioned.
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Amanda 6 years ago on 06/10/13
Equipped: Flux Capacitor named "THE FALLOPIAN TUBES OF TIME TRAVEL"
the idea that a 3-D printed metal gun would just self-destruct is pretty ludicrous to be honest.

buuuut it does have other problems. 3-D printed parts require additional machining to have a smooth finish, so as we learned from the cast iron muskets of the 1700s, we'd have some accuracy problems.
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Chrispy 6 years ago on 06/11/13
Equipped: The Most Annoying Fairy Ever named "Hey! Listen! Hey! Hey! Listen!"
Eh, that's a stretch. The "gun" part of a gun, the only part of the weapon that is potentially legislate-able is the receiver. The barrel, the stock, the trigger, the sights, these things are all available for any weapon without a background check. These "accuracy problems" are therefore non-existent in a 3d printed weapon.
PS: Besides, the accuracy of a smooth bore musket was around 100-150 yards, as opposed to the 500 yards of a rifled barrel musket.
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Frito 6 years ago on 06/11/13
Equipped: Issue of Newtype
The heat isn't the issue you can hold a shell in your hand if it's the first round shot. the worst that could happen is the shell could be fused with the plastic (if the gun didn't explode) The gun barrel is just meant to withstand the initial explosion and shape the force. If you put in a metal tube for receiving the round you'd solve 90% of plastic guns problems. A bullet firing without a gun usually explodes outwards rather than forwards, and the bullet usually has no more force than a solid punch.
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Amanda 6 years ago on 06/11/13
Equipped: Flux Capacitor named "THE FALLOPIAN TUBES OF TIME TRAVEL"
I can't tell any more if the conversation at hand is about being about to reproduce a fully functional gun with a 3-D printer (what I was addressing)

or the semantics of producing the "gun" part of the gun with a 3-D printer and buying the rest of the parts.

either way, whatever
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Chrispy 6 years ago on 06/11/13
Equipped: The Most Annoying Fairy Ever named "Hey! Listen! Hey! Hey! Listen!"
I support your conclusion, that 3D printing is advancing at such a rate that soon one will be able to manufactor a gun without any oversight at all.

However, I was clarifying your facts. Guns will not "self destruct" before they accomplish what they intend to do. They will have reasonable accuracy and last long enough that degradation will not be an issue before a replacement can be cheaply constructed.
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Amanda 6 years ago on 06/11/13
Equipped: Flux Capacitor named "THE FALLOPIAN TUBES OF TIME TRAVEL"
I also said it was silly that they would self-destruct!

and I have no idea what you mean by "3D printing is advancing at such a rate that soon one will be able to manufactor a gun without any oversight at all"

I think we can already 3D print guns that are whatever fine and you can shoot people with em, as in we have the technology to do it in this country.

I completely disagree that it's the same or will be the same for individual hobbyists in the foreseeable future.
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Chrispy 6 years ago on 06/11/13
Equipped: The Most Annoying Fairy Ever named "Hey! Listen! Hey! Hey! Listen!"
You don't think that home 3D printers will be able to print out receivers that are completely untraceable in the near future?

I completely disagree, but time will tell, I guess.
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Amanda 6 years ago on 06/12/13
Equipped: Flux Capacitor named "THE FALLOPIAN TUBES OF TIME TRAVEL"
Again I think we're having 2 different conversations!
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Imaginos 6 years ago on 06/15/13
Equipped: A Really Sharp Pointy Thing
Just to be safe the lawmakers are rushing to ban this new menace..

http://...cnet.com/...y-face-regulations-bans-in-new-york/

The part where this gets silly is that the law would impact 3d printed guns.. however if i have CNC machine i can make a real metal rifle and it would not require registration.
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Mel 6 years ago on 06/16/13
Equipped: Silly Pictures of noiwontsayplease named "I'm just holding them for a friend!"
The little plastic 3D-printed guns are similar in form to the Liberator pistol that the United States produced en masse during World War II and distributed to the French Resistance.

They were shitty, ugly little guns stamped out of pot metal. It wasn't meant to last for more than one shot. You were supposed to shoot a Nazi at point-blank range, then take THEIR gun.

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