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Gen. Chat “Home Improvement/DIY” by domminess

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Kirei the Klown 4 years ago on 12/30/14
Equipped: Chicken & Waffles named "My baby daddy love him some Roscoes!"
I need to look into some floor refinishing myself - our upstairs landing still has traces of paint on it from some previous coating that was mostly, but not thoroughly, removed.

I'm not entirely sure on the stripping of paper under paint... I have removed wallpaper alone, though, and it's essentially alot of soaking (when I did it, I used a watered down general cleaner (Formula 409 I think), though I've seen recommendations for a 50/50 water/vinegar solution (which sounds like it would be much less irritating to breathe in and touch for the duration of the task), and then a lot of scraping. Or at least it was for me, as one of the major areas I removed paper from was massively overglued. Other parts I could peel off once I got a good edge started.

I will cross my fingers for you that the paper you've got is not overglued!
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Grave 4 years ago on 01/11/15
Equipped: Bad Mother F*cker Wallet named "I ain't even gotta say it."
Make sure you use a scoring tool before applying your wallpaper remover solution, this helps it penetrate better. A heat gun also works for tougher spots. Depending on if you have plaster walls vs drywall, multiple layers of wallpaper... sometimes its quicker and easier to just drop the wall and re-drywall if it gets really bad and you end up gauging the walls trying to get the paper off.

As far as other general tips:
- Before you start every project protect your floors with some form of floor protection, thick builder paper, tarp, etc.. and protect from the outside into the room you are working in. If you are drywalling or demoing, also enclose the area floor to ceiling, you will be amazed the amount of dust that pops up.

- Invest in a good quality tape such as Frog or painters 3M when painting. It may be 3x more money but its worth it when you pull off the tape.

- Invest in a core set of quality tools, Rigid or Dewalt at the minimum, and rent some of the more expensive ones from HD or Lowes.

- Dont be afraid to rent a dumpster for your projects if you are taking down walls. They should start at around $250-300 for a 10 yarder, its easier/faster than trying to cut pieces of wood or drywall to fit into bags.

- Budget 30% more money and time to every project than you expect.

- When you are dealing with a house in the 100+ year old range be prepared to run into a ton of odd renovations that occurred along the way by less than credible handymen. A non load bearing wall could actually turn out to be one that someone took out when they shouldn't.

- Test and be very careful of lead, asbestos and mold. They show up in the weirdest places that your inspector will never look or know to look.

- Focus on the outside first. Make sure your house is water and draft tight. Nothing is worse than spending a ton of time inside only to find out during your first snowstorm that you need a new roof. After outside focus on core upgrades such as getting a 200 amp service for electrical and make sure your plumbing is up to par. Then worry about cosmetic upgrades.

Take your time and set the vision for your house early on so you can plan ahead.
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Grave 4 years ago on 01/11/15
Equipped: Bad Mother F*cker Wallet named "I ain't even gotta say it."
One last thing.

As someone who is 5 years into rebuilding a 140 year old house, and is rebuilding everything from scratch, finish your projects and contain the mess to one area.

Nothing is worse than living in a construction zone for an extended period of time.

My latest project is the bedroom with the center piece being a 19ft long, 9ft high, wardrobe in the bedroom. 10 year old houses don't have much closet space.

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Grave 4 years ago on 01/11/15
Equipped: Bad Mother F*cker Wallet named "I ain't even gotta say it."
^^^100 year old don't have much closet space.
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Kirei the Klown 4 years ago on 01/13/15
Equipped: Chicken & Waffles named "My baby daddy love him some Roscoes!"
Grave said:
^^^100 year old don't have much closet space.


Tell me about it. Ours isn't even 100 yet (built 1930) and as far as I can tell it was built with 0 closets. I think someone improvised a somewhat poorly planned closet (it partially obscures a window) on the upstairs landing, and someone added kneewall closets to one upstairs bedroom much more recently - that's it. Hence why we just dropped a goodly chunk on adding recessed shelving in our other bedroom. Back in the day, if I remember correctly, wardrobes were the storage device that was "in."

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